About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
the telecommunications industry was knee deep in this. they can -- in-line in us as to what went right. obviously all was not hunky dory. people lost power. is that something that could not be prevented? is this something if we changed might be prevented in the future? last summer a storm knocked out 911. these things are becoming more commonplace. a hearing would allow us to investigate the reliability of the networks and identify and highlight the best practices and addressed potential vulnerabilities in our communications infrastructure. obviously i want to hear what the industry has to say. we can help in light in congress as to what we should be doing to prevent this from happening in the future. >> representative engel, have you heard back from chairman upton? >> we have not. it was sent to chairman upton and the chairman of the telecommunications subcommittee. this proposed hearing is not to be adversarial. it should be bipartisan and we want to find out what happened. i do not think there is anyone who would not want to do that. i would take it one step further. i would like to see a separate
. it cannot be business as usual asiran in the year it was written about the way the u.s. government organized itself at that level to deal with the reactor in syria. the bush administration organized its iraq policy in another way. there are several models out there but it is important that i ran not be seen as one of 10 or 15 problems we have to deal with on a daily basis. iran is problem number one and will be for awhile. there are plenty of other problems in the middle east. first, syria -- i concur with everything dennis said. first of all, for the longest time, many people thought the fall of assad was inevitable so we would not have to do that much to provoke it. i'm not so sure, not because i don't think this insurgency is effected. i have been on the receiving end of a number of insurgencies in my career is. this is a very powerful and effective one. iran has command -- has committed -- syria has committed powerful friends that appear to be ready to go to the mat to make sure the assad regime will stay in power. that is russia and iran. the result could be an assad that stays in power
you just mentioned, but someone who basically has used elections in non-democratic ways. he is elected in but then takes seriously non-democratic measures internally. that is a very difficult situation to grapple with in terms of fundamentalists. >> from my european point of view, the so-called unipolar moment has led us in nato, led the west, led the united states, in my view, to over emphasize the possible use of the military. i think over the last decade we have been forced to acknowledge the fact the obligation of military force tends to solve, at best, military challenges, but if he were faced with a political problem, you need a political solution, which means more than just the military. that appears to me to be a growing consensus in our community. and that leads me to the first question about what the gentleman over there asked about development and the military. as a practitioner of diplomacy, i find that the last decade and have shut have taught us one clear lesson -- and a half should have taught us one clear lesson. it was not so difficult to get nato to go into the balkan
with us. welcome back to the continuation of our debate. with us today, congressman allen west and patrick murphy. we will continue our discussion with george bennett. >> we left hanging on the deficit. you are opposed to raising taxes. the deficit this past year was $1.1 trillion. if you are not going to raise taxes, what are the things you can cut to get close to erasing a $1.1 trillion deficit? >> we should be about $230 billion, but we have to look at agencies that were created that are not meeting up to their mission. you look at the department at energy that was created when i was a teenager. it was to make the united states energy independent. what has happened with that department over the last 40 years? we look at the expansion of the government and education. when we separated education out of health, education, and welfare. we have spent more money at education at the federal government level, money that could have been used better at the local levels. we have to look at these duplicative programs. we have got to move away from baseline budget to zero-based budget. >> the gao ha
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)